How to Stop Being Lazy

  1. To-Do Lists Are Evil. Schedule Everything.
  2. Assume You’re Going Home at 5:30, Then Plan Your Day Backwards
  3. Make A Plan For The Entire Week
  4. Do Very Few Things, But Be Awesome At Them
  5. Less Shallow Work, Focus On The Deep Stuff

Schedules and plans sound cold and clinical but the end result couldn’t be farther from that.

You’ll be less stressed, create more time for friends and family, and make things you can be proud of.

Excerpts of article from bakadesuyo.com

No Time to Exercise? Take the Stairs

No More Excuses – Take the Stairs

running stairsResearchers at McMaster University have debunked two of the most popular excuses people use to avoid exercising: not enough time and no access to a gym. They did that by demonstrating that short, intense stair climbing has a surprising amount of health benefits.

In one experiment, a group was asked to climb stairs aggressively in 20 second intervals, while the second group was asked to simply ride an exercise bike for the same length of time. Results showed that the short 20 second bursts of stair climbing were more effective than the exercise bike.

“Interval training offers a convenient way to fit exercise into your life, rather than having to structure your life around exercise,” says study author Martin Gibala. Remember that next time you have the option to take the stairs instead of the elevator.

Article from http://www.livingfuel.com

 

3 Small Things Every Person Can Do to Reduce Stress in Their Office

In a world of tight deadlines, it’s no wonder that some of your stress might seep out and affect your colleagues. But — because they’re under pressures of their own — you risk perpetuating a vicious circle, where you mirror and magnify each other’s frenzy.

First, stop being vague. If someone doesn’t know the full context of a situation, vague messages — which might be quite harmless — are often read like a Rorschach test, with fears and interpretations piled on. If you send a late-night email to a coworker that says, “We need to talk,” without further explanation, that can trigger an unhelpful cascade: Is there a problem? What did I do? Is she going to reprimand me?

Second, triage your responses. We all know email can be overwhelming — the average professional sends or receives 122 messages per day, according to one study — and in order to make progress on important projects, I’ll often go days without responding to emails. Usually, this isn’t a problem; most missives are informational and non-urgent. But there’s one glaring exception: messages that contain specific, time-sensitive inquiries. Can you come to the meeting Friday at 4pm? Do you approve the new draft of the presentation for tomorrow? Should we extend the job offer to Anika or Marco?

Finally, stop watching the kettle boil. Just as it’s damaging to neglect communication, as above, and let your colleagues languish without your necessary input, it’s just as bad to monitor them relentlessly. If you’re a perfectionist, or feel a keen sense of responsibility about a given project, you might feel tempted to watch their every move to ensure they’re performing, on time and on budget. That’s a laudable impulse, but the net result is that your colleagues will feel hounded, mistrusted, and micromanaged. In fact, scrutinizing them too closely is likely to make them perform worse, as demonstrated via research into the phenomenon of “choking under pressure.”

Monitor your own tendencies, instead. Recognize that responsible professionals thrive when they’re given autonomy, and work with them to establish a timeline and agreed-upon metrics of progress. That way, you can check in at appropriate intervals and they won’t feel blindsided. That takes the pressure off and allows them to do their best work.

Excerpts of article from hbr.org

Vitamin C breakthrough discovery: Low-cost nutrient halts growth of cancer stem cells… 1000% more effective than cancer drug… peer-reviewed science confirms powerful effects

An exciting medical breakthrough published in the science journal Oncotarget has discovered the astonishing ability of concentrated vitamin C to halt the growth of cancer tumor stem cells.

The study, conducted at the University of Salford in Manchester — (see full text of the study at this link) — tested the impact on cancer stem cell metabolism for seven substances:

Three natural substances, including vitamin C
Three experimental pharmaceuticals
One clinical drug currently in widespread use

The study’s astonishing results reveal “the first evidence that Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) can be used to target and kill cancer stem cells (CSCs), the cells responsible for fuelling fatal tumours,” reports the flagship science publisher Alpha Galileo.

Led by Michael P. Lisanti and Gloria Bonuccelli, the study results astonished researchers when it found that vitamin C worked up to 10 times better than a pharmaceutical cancer drug at interfering with cancer stem cell metabolism, effectively shutting down cancer tumors’ ability to process cellular energy for survival and growth.

Excerpts of article from NaturalNews.com

How much sleep do you really need?

We are used to hearing that 8 hours is the magic number – here’s the truth:

WE ALL know 8 hours is the magic number for a decent night’s sleep. Or is it?

Nobody seems to know where this number came from. In questionnaires, people tend to say they sleep for between 7 and 9 hours a night, which might explain why 8 hours has become a rule of thumb. But people also tend to overestimate how long they have been out for the count.

According to Jerome Siegel, who studies sleep at the University of California, Los Angeles, the 8 hour rule has no basis in our evolutionary past – his study of tribal cultures with no access to electricity found that they get just 6 or 7 hours. “And those people are pretty healthy,” adds Derk-Jan Dijk at the University of Surrey, UK.

So perhaps 8 hours is the wrong target and we can get by just fine with 7. This seems to be a minimum requirement. A recent analysis in the US concluded that regularly getting less sleep than that increases the risk of obesity, heart disease, depression, and early death, and recommended that all adults aim for at least 7 hours.
Sleep: the magic numbers

By this benchmark, recent reports seem to suggest we are walking around in a state of sleep deprivation. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 35 per cent of US adults are getting less than 7 hours a night, and a survey in the UK found that the average was 6.8 hours.

Excerpts of article from newscientist.com